Teacher's Manual

Discovering bidding: the 1NT opening bid

Session 4.3 : Bidding a major contract on a 1NT opening


Session program


  • Discovering the major fit
  • Deciding on a major contract
  • Notions of planning the hand with trump

Reminders

These reminders are done in the form of questions to the pupils:

  • What are the conditions for a 1NT opening?
    Having 16 to 18 points, a balanced hand, at least two cards in your shortest suit.
  • Which are the major suits?
    Hearts and Spades.
  • What is a major fit?
    Eight cards or more in the major suit between the two hands of the same side.

Majors et minors :
Contracts in Heart and Spade score more points than those played in Club and Diamond (refer to scoring table). It is therefore more interesting to play in Heart or Spade, when possible… This may also be the reason why these two suits are called "majors" [while their less endowed counterparts are called minors…]


Finding a major fit

Have the children discover thatů

On a 1NT opening, when the responder owns six cards in a major suit, he is sure of finding a fit as the opener has at least two cards in the suit.


Don’t speak of the case of a fit with a 5-5 major two-suiter.


Bidding a contract

With a six-card major, the responder should bid the right contract in Hearts or Spades referring to the Decision Table.
The responder’s hand must be evaluated in HCP and distribution points, also called total points (TP)..
Remind them how to count distribution points.
Prepare a few responder hands that will be placed face up on the table to be studied one after the other. Have them evaluate total points when rebidding on a 1NT opening.

1
2
3
  A Q 8 7 5 3
  6
  K 9 6
  J 4 2
  Q 10 8 7 4 2
  6
  J 6 3
  9 6 3
  A J 9 8 4 3
  6
  K Q 5
  A J 2

 

 


Hand 1 :
The responder has 12 points. The side total points amounts to at least 28 but can never reach 33.
You bid a game at 4 contract.

Hand 2 : The responder has 5 points. The side cannot have more than 23 total points. You can’t think of playing a game. 
You bid 2 .

Hand 3 : The responder has 17 points. The side has at least 33 total points.
You have to bid a small slam at 6  .

The final contract is chosen by the responder; the opener must pass.

Don’t speak of any artificial bid, such as Stayman and Texas, nor any invitational bid with a major 5th.


Notions for planning the play in a suit contract

We have already spoken of playing with trump in theme 3 when discovering that trump allows you to take extra tricks by ruffing in the short hand
We are now going to review the specific dangers of trump play – the opponents’ ruff -; the cases when you shouldn’t hurry to draw the trumps (for example start with short hand ruffs or with discards before giving the lead).

Before playing the first card, the declarer should ask himself a few questions concerning trumps:

  • Do I have a short hand ruff?
  • What are my risks?
    -  an opponent’s ruff?
    - go down when giving the lead?


During the session, you will show the pupils how to properly manage trumps:

  • When to draw the opponents’ trumps?
    - immediately
    - after an urgent discard
    - after a short hand ruff
  • Observe the opponents’ trump residue
  • In defence, take ruff tricks after the opening lead of a singleton.


Application Hands

Session first hand (4.3.1)

Urgent discard

Hand 4.3.1     Dealer North

 
  A Q J
  Q J 9
  Q 8 7 6 2
  A 2
 
  9 8 5 4
  A 7
  10 9
  K Q J 6 3
 
N
  10 7 6 3
  K 6
  A K J
  10 9 8 7
W
 
E
 
S
 
 
  K 2
  10 8 5 4 3 2
  5 4 3
  5 4
 

South
West
North
East
1NT
2  
I pass

 

Lead: K
Bidding: Evaluation of points, certainty of a fit
Declarer’s play: Don’t play trump before having discarded a Club or a Diamond on the Spades.
Score: 2   = : 110 NS


Session second hand (4.3.2)

Short hand ruff

Hand 4.3.2     Dealer East

 
  A K 5 3
  J 4 3
  A 7
  A 6 3 2
 
  Q J 10 8
  K Q 7
  10 8 4
  K 9 5
 
N
  9 4 2
  6
  Q J 6 5 2
  J 10 8 7
W
 
E
 
S
 
 
  7 6
  A 10 9 8 5 2
  K 9 3
  Q 4
 

South
West
North
East
I pass
I pass
I pass
1NT
4  

 

Lead: Q
Bidding: Evaluation of points, certainty of a fit
Declarer’s play: Don’t play trump before having discarded a Club or a Diamond on the Spades.
Score: 4   = : 420 NS



Session third hand (4.3.3)

Defence: Lead of a singleton

Hand 4.3.3     Dealer South

 
  K 7 2
  A 9 7 2
  A K Q J
  9 2
 
  9 8 5
  Q J 4 3
  7
  J 7 6 5 3
 
N
  A
  10 6 5
  10 8 5 4 2
  A Q 10 8
W
 
E
 
S
 
 
  Q J 10 6 4 3
  K 8
  9 6 3
  K 4
 

South
West
North
East
I pass
1NT
4  
I pass

 

Lead: 7
Bidding: Evaluation of points, certainty of a fit
Defence’s play: Lead of the singleton, and finding which suit to switch (Clubs…).
Score :
4   = : 420 NS
4   -1 : 50 EW


Session fourth hand (4.3.4)

Draw trumps to avoid ruff

Hand 4.3.4     Dealer West

 
  J 4
  A K 2
  A K 6 4
  Q 6 3 2
 
  K Q 9
  J 5
  Q 10 5 3
  10 9 8 7
 
N
  A 8
  10 9 7 6 4 3
  J 9 7
  5 4
W
 
E
 
S
 
 
  10 7 6 5 3 2
  Q 8
  8 2
  A K J
 

South
West
North
East
I pass
1NT
4
I pass

 

Lead: 10
Bidding: Evaluation of points, certainty of a fit
Declarer: Start with drawing the opponents’ trumps.
Score: 4   = : 420 NS