Teacher's Manual

Our first major openings

Session 5.3 : The 1 or 1 openings, simple raise



Session program

  • Simple raise bids
  • Dialog after a raise by the responder
  • Opening leads against a trump contract

Simple raise bid on a 1  or 1  opening

Remind your pupils the conditions for a 1-major opening.
During this session, you will have the pupils learn about 2-level raises, with examples cards on table.
In no case will you have them work on a rebid zones table. Just let the two partners understand what contract they feel like playing.
Optimists may bid a game with 22 points and timid players might play only 1 when you easily can win 4, but it doesn’t matter… They only need to realize that it is always a good thing for them to bid the right contract, and that the aim of biddings is finding it.

My partner opened with 1 : what will I bid with the following hands?


1
2
3
4
5
  A J 8 4
  K Q 7
  J
  K Q J 9 7
  A J 8
  A K 7
  8 7
  Q 10 9 5 3
  10 8 2
  J 7
  8 7 4 2
  10 9 5 3
  K Q 10 8
  A 7
  8 7 4 2
  10 9 3
  10 8 2
  A K 7
  J 8 7 4 2
  10 9





  17 HCP + 4 D   14 HCP + 1 D   1 HCP + 1 D   9 HCP + 3 D   8 HCP + 1 D
  6     4     Pass   3     2


Hands 1 to 4 are revisions…

Hand 5: I have three cards in Spades, and therefore a fit. My hand is worth 9 total points (8 HCP and 1 distribution point for the doubleton). I will raise at 2-level: I respond 2  .

Further bidding

Let the opener bid what he wishes and the responder may even rebid again…
The behavior for both the opener’s and the responder’s second bid will depend on their evaluation of the minimum and maximum total points in the partnership.

Lead against trump contracts

Without saying anything beforehand, have them play the application hands and let them guess the opening leads, then explain.

They have already seen the opening lead with a sequence with two honors only, the higher of the two.

We haven’t forgotten…!  They won’t study any No Trump "opening lead principle" this year.

Lead with a singleton

In defence, it gives a chance to take tricks by ruffing with small trumps.
(Children often have difficulties understanding that defenses’ trumps have the same ruffing power as the declarer’s …)
It is no use leading a singleton when you have a sure trick in trumps (Q J 10 for example).

Leading a trump

Playing trump when in defence doesn’t aim at winning tricks, but at preventing the declarer from ruffing with the small trumps in the short hand

Going further,

Leads to be avoided: under an isolated high honor (Ace or King)


Leads against No Trump contracts regularly come back.

6
 
  7 4
In a No Trump contract, defence will win two tricks in this suit. In a trump contract  (other suit), defence will win no tricks in the suit as after taking the Ace and Queen, the declarer will ruff in the dummy.
  K 9 5 2
  J 10 8 6
 
  A Q 3


Session first hand (5.3.1)

Hand 5.3.1     Dealer North

 
  A 5
  K 6 4
  J 10 7 5 3
  9 7 2
 
  J 9 7 6 3
  7 5 2
  2
  Q 10 8 6
 
N
  8 4 2
  J 9
  A 9 8 6
  A 5 4 3
W
 
E
 
S
 
 
  K Q 10
  A Q 10 8 3
  K Q 4
  K J
 

South
West
North
East
I pass
I pass
1  
2  
4  
I pass

 

Lead: 2
Card play:
Defence: lead of the singleton. After ruffing, return a Club, the only suit where the partner may be in hand to have you ruff a second time.
Score: 4  -1 : 50 EW

 

Session second hand (5.3.2)

Hand 5.3.2     Dealer East

 
  K 10 2
  K J 5
  7 4 3
  J 6 5 3
 
  Q 6 4
  8 6 3
  A Q 5 2
  K 9 7
 
N
  J 8 7 5
  A 2
  J 10 9
  Q 8 4 2
W
 
E
 
S
 
 
  A 9 3
  Q 10 9 7 4
  K 8 6
  A 10
 

South
West
North
East
I pass
1  
2  
I pass

 

Lead: 3
Card play:
Defence: all leads are dangerous, except the trump lead.
After the lead of a Heart, the declarer should win only seven tricks…
Score: 2   - 1 : 50 EW



Session third hand (5.3.3)

Hand 5.3.3     Dealer South

 
  7 4
  A Q 10 7
  9 8 6 2
  Q 4 2
 
  A K Q 10 5
  8 2
  5 3
  J 10 9 7
 
N
  J 9 6 2
  6 3
  Q 7 4
  K 8 6 5
W
 
E
 
S
 
  8 3
  K J 9 5 4
  A K J 10
  A 3
 

South
West
North
East
1  
3  
4
I pass

 

Lead: A
Bidding: bidding of the right contract
Defence: after the Ace and King of Spades, West returns the Jack of Clubs. East has to play the right card.
Declarer: finesse of the Queen of Diamonds.
Score: 4   = 420 NS



Session fourth hand (5.3.4)

Hand 5.3.4     Dealer West

 
  10 7 6
  8 4 3
  9 7 5 4 3
  A K
 
  Q 8 3
  6 5 2
  K J
  Q J 10 8 5
 
N
  J 9
  K 10 9 7
  A Q 10 2
  9 6 4
W
 
E
 
S
 
  A K 5 4 2
  A Q J
  8 6
  7 3 2
 

South
West
North
East
I pass
I pass
I pass
1  
2  
I pass

 

Lead: Q
Declarer: only two rounds of trump, then ruff the small losing Club in your hand with the last trump in the dummy. Finesse the King of Hearts.
Score: 2   + 2 = 170 NS